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Whats good 420SA fam! :-rolled

I am always trying to learn more about sustainable practices, whether its for growing my own veggies or Cannabis outdoors.

After lurking around on the organic vs synthetic thread, I believe the only sustainable way forward is regenerative farming practices.

I am guilty of buying a bottle of nutrients now and then, but the truth is, these products have a huge carbon footprint, even the "organic" ranges.

Please share your thoughts and ideas about regenerative farming practices, if you are already busy with it, share some tips and tricks with us.

:-thumbsup

 

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Woah, that is a long video. Will have to watch it when I have some time.

 

I am not sure what Regenerative Farming Practices are exactly... Although I a going to guess it is a more natural way of doing things?

Letting the microbes and soil and plants live in harmony together and provide for one another?

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Building soil from scratch for a personal grow is not too difficult, it requires time and patience. Been taking so pics of a soilbin I started from scratch a while ago.

The basics for my method is very similiar to a worm bin, except i dont add much fruit and foodscraps, mostly weed stalks and leaves with cardboard, with the odd worm finding its way in. Throwing some leftover smoothies in once in a while seems to supercharge things.

 

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Edited by Dank
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Hmm, some hectic mold there. I guess it breaks it all down?

Would not have thought of using cardboard...

 

How long does the whole process take?

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Been keeping an eye this thread

It's nice to see other people have the same ideas. Cardboard is only processed wood fibre or lignin/cellulose and can be composted or recycled easily. (Just keep the cellulose fibres away from ethylene glycol and brake fluid you may end up with nitro cellulose and glisyrine which is the unstable compound in dynamite)

All our kitchen scraps/trimmings and garden refuse go to the compost pile and our garden produce attests to the benefits.
We recycle/repurpose as much as possible, but peoples mindset is way behind unfortunately and it needs to change.
So much more is possible, I believe we can achieve almost zero waste with a bit of effort.

Was involved in a local recycling project focused on domestic municipal waste streams, had a 95% recycling rate(the numbers would shock you)
It can be done and we did it.

The more you take out of your personal waste stream the less ends up in landfill.
That is the long and short of it.... they bury the shit like a time bomb, in a hole in the ground, then cap it with clay and rezone it for residential development on ''reclaimed land''.

We need more creative ideas in these lines to reduce our ''footprint''.
I'm on board with@Dank, if you can compost it and make awesome food for your plants- why not.
We should all try and do it.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

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@PsyCLown it depends on quite a few variables I would say, but staring from scratch, perhaps 6 - 8 months (not adding new biomass) in a temperate zone, could take up too a year. I have never recorded the time it takes so will record the dates etc when i started, and when i stop adding biomass.

There is a way to fast forward this, you can fill up the remaining half of the bin with soil from your veg garden, after some good ol moldy mycellium networks are going. This speeds up the process considerrabily, but a lot less new soil is created. 

@Bospatrollie2 thanks a lot for the input bro, and I take my hat off to you and your community for doing some real recycling, and putting in the effort needed to protect ecosystems. Nice to hear this! 

Urban farmers need to be mindfull about where they source their biomass and such, i make sure I remove plastic tapes and discard sections that have glue on them. 

Dudes on farms and urban farmers could also collaborate locally, building soils from cowdung, or old lucern bales that wont get used. Cattle farming has a high carbon footprint, weed plants consume CO2.

Edited by Dank
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Going to try out using some Bokashi this season (diy growkashi), does anybody have experience with a setup like this Gro-Kashi?

 

Edited by Dank

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